NEW ZEALAND PREPPERS
Disaster Survival Guide!
 


SNARES AND TRAPS

Survival is the intersection between knowledge and necessity. The outcome in a survival scenario can be dramatically influenced by practicing survival skills before you need them. One such skill that requires thoughtful practice is How to Build a Small Game Survival Snare. A primitive make-shift snare can be used to trap and kill a variety of animals for food in a survival situation.

SNARES AND TRAPS
Survival is the intersection between knowledge and necessity. The outcome in a survival scenario can be dramatically influenced by practicing survival skills before you need them. One such skill that requires thoughtful practice is How to Build a Small Game Survival Snare. A primitive make-shift snare can be used to trap and kill a variety of animals for food in a survival situation.
Ground Snare
Position the snare at head height and tie off the end to a tree, a stake in the ground, or a log that the animal can only drag a short distance as the noose tightens. Make snares from cord, fishing line, or wire if available.
Spring Snare
This set a trigger that snatches game into the air as it strains against the noose. It's good for rabbits and game as large as deer.
Spring Deadfall
One of the easiest traps to make and set, the spring deadfall depends upon the game worrying the bait, so it's best used for carnivorous animals and rodents such as pack rats.
Spring Spear Trap
This trip-wire set is effective for wild pigs, deer, or other game that regularly sticks to defined game trails. Make certain the horizontal thrust of the spear is at a level that will impale the body of the game sought. This is an extremely dangerous trap; use it with caution.

Bird Traps
Birds can be much easier to trap than mammals and should be among your first targets for a meal.
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Bird Pole
Set this trap in a large clearing where birds will naturally seek it out as a landing place.
Step One;
Sharpen both ends of a 6-foot pole and drill a small hole near one end. Drive the other end into the ground until it is secure.
Step Two;
Cut a 6-inch-long stick that will loosely fit into the hole. Tie a rock to a thin cord and pass the cord through the hole in the pole, then make a slip noose that drapes over the perch.
Step Three:
Tie an overhand knot in the cord in back of the slip noose and place the stick against the hole. Tension should hold it in position. When a bird flies down and perches, it will displace the stick, the rock will fall, and its feet will be caught as the loop quickly slides through the hole.

Twizel New Zealand
New Zealand Disaster Survival Guide!
New Zealand, Preppers NZ, Survival, Doomsday Preppers NZ, Emergency, Earthquake,
Storm, Flood, Tsunami, Volcanic Eruption, Landslide, Pandemic,Fire, Emergency Survival Skills,
Disaster Preperation, Economic Disaster, Survival NZ
Twizel New Zealand