NEW ZEALAND PREPPERS
Disaster Survival Guide!
 


MYLAR BAGS FOR FOOD STORAGE

Sealing food in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers is one of the best ways to store your emergency foods. A Mylar bag is a vapor barrier bag that blocks oxygen, moisture and light, the three big enemies of food storage. Think of it as a flexible metal can. Many preppers get by just fine with using only food grade buckets and oxygen absorbers. Most foods will keep for years stored that way.

MYLAR BAGS FOR FOOD STORAGE
Mylar BagsTwizel New Zealand
Sealing food in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers is one of the best ways to store your emergency foods. A Mylar bag is a vapor barrier bag that blocks oxygen, moisture and light, the three big enemies of food storage. Think of it as a flexible metal can. Many preppers get by just fine with using only food grade buckets and oxygen absorbers. Most foods will keep for years stored that way.
However, the problem is that plastic is a very poor vapor barrier and over time oxygen and moisture will actually work its way right through even a 5 gallon bucket, right into your stored products. Using a Mylar bag greatly reduces this and can add years to the storage life of your emergency supply. Rice, wheat, grains, pasta etc is said to stay fresh after 20-30 years in these mylar bags with oxygen absorbers!
Bulk Food Storage Using Plastic Buckets and Mylar

New to prepping? Wondering how others use those large buckets and Mylar bags for food storage? Wonder no more. The mystery that is Mylar will be revealed in three easy phases.

1. Plastic buckets are generally used for bulk storage because they're fairly rodent proof. They tend towards water impermeability, but they're not always great at that. What they really do is keep the mice and rats out of your food. Important thing, right?

2. The second layer of the food storage is a plastic Mylar bag. Mylar evolved out of the NASA space program and is a really cool material which is used everywhere. It's an interior layer of polyester and an exterior layer of evaporated aluminum that has the ability to keep all moisture out of the things you store inside it. It is not, however, strong enough to be used on its own - you need an exterior layer.

3. The third thing that goes into many Mylar bags is something to kill bugs. I use oxygen absorbers. You can purchase these purpose made, or you can simply buy off the shelf hand warmers at the end of the winter season. Either way, the iron filings/powder will reduce the amount of oxygen left in the bag after it is sealed, thus reducing the ability of vermin to live in your stored food.

Instructions
Step 1- Get plastic buckets. I get mine free from my local grocery store bakery. These are food grade. However, when you are using Mylar, you have the choice to use other materials that are not, such as dry-wall buckets. Food grade plastic will not leach any chemicals into your stored food. Other buckets might. Use these at your own risk and with your own best judgement.
Step 2 - Purchase Mylar bags and insert into the bucket. Fill with what ever food product you are storing.
Step 3- Open O2 absorber and toss into bucket.
Step 4- Press all the air you can out of the top of the bag.
Step 5 - Have, on hand, a hot iron and a board. Flatten out bag at its seams and use iron to seal the bag. Mylar adheres to itself with heat, so just iron it shut and double-check that no air is able to get in and out - I do this by flattening the whole thing down as I fold the extra material into the bucket. If there is a little bubble of air pressing back at me, it's a good seal. Alternately, you could pull the extra material up and see if it sucks air back down into the bag.
Step 6 - Put lid on bucket
Step 7 - Label and date so that you can rotate the stock.

Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Home storage should consist of a year’s supply of basic food, clothing, and, where possible, fuel. After this goal has been reached, emergency and expanded storage should begin.

1. The choice of storage foods depends on availability, nutritive value, cost, storage qualities, and other considerations. Store foods that the family is willing to eat. In times of stress, it may be difficult to eat unfamiliar or disliked foods.

2. Store a variety of foods, as no single food has all the essential nutrients in the correct proportions.

3. Store the highest quality or grade of food obtainable. For example, wheat should be cereal grade, double cleaned, at least 11 percent protein, and no more than 10 percent moisture.

4. Store foods in sturdy metal, plastic, or glass containers with tightly fitting lids. Sturdy wooden, straw, or earthenware containers may also be used, but a plastic bag liner would help protect the food from possible contamination.

5. Store foods in areas that permit easy access and allow control of temperature and humidity. (In general, cool temperatures prolong storage life and quality.) Not all storage items should be located in one area of the house; not all should be stored in one type of container.

6. To destroy insects that may infest grains, nuts, dried fruits, or other foods, place the food in temperatures of 0° F. (or below) for four days. As an alternative, the food may be sterilized by being heated at low temperature (around 200° F.) for about one hour, depending on the nature of the food. Spread the food on shallow pans so that the heat can penetrate easily. Stir the food occasionally to keep it from scorching. Dry ice kills most adult insects and larvae, but it probably will not destroy the eggs or pupae. Pour two inches of grain into the bottom of the container. Add dry ice; then fill with grain. Eight ounces of dry ice is recommended for one hundred pounds of grain, or one pound for each thirty gallons of stored grain. Seal the containers loosely for five to six hours; then seal them tightly.

7. Storage foods should be planned for and acquired according to an orderly and systematic plan. Food costs can be minimized by budgeting and shopping wisely. Borrowing money to acquire food storage is not a good idea.

8. Use stored foods on a regular basis to maintain quality and minimize waste. Maintain a food inventory and replace items as they are used.

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New Zealand Disaster Survival Guide!
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