NEW ZEALAND PREPPERS
Disaster Survival Guide!
 


CAR EMERGENCY SURVIVAL KIT

Warmth, of course, is a major concern in cold climate and snow emergencies. Since you'll be with your car, you'll have that as protection against the elements. but extra clothing (preferably wool), some blankets, and a sleeping bag will keep you warm if you are stranded for several days. It's no fun being stranded and cold, and hypothermia is a real danger in cold weather.

VEHICLES - EMERGENCY PREPARATION
CAR EMERGENCY SURVIVAL GETAWAY KIT
Warmth, of course, is a major concern in cold climate and snow emergencies. Since you'll be with your car, you'll have that as protection against the elements. but extra clothing (preferably wool), some blankets, and a sleeping bag will keep you warm if you are stranded for several days. Store these items in a plastic trash bag in your trunk or behind the seat of your pickup. I recommend wool clothing because it sheds moisture, just in case you have to leave your car during wet or snowy weather. It's no fun being stranded and cold, and hypothermia is a real danger in cold weather.
KEEP WARM AND SAFE
If stranded, you may not want to run your vehicle heater for very long so you can conserve gasoline. But if you do run your car engine to operate the car heater, be sure you aren't breathing in carbon monoxide fumes from the exhaust. In a snow emergency, you must make certain that the car's exhaust pipe is not clogged with snow, and be sure the exhaust is not being sucked into the car through an open window at the rear of the vehicle. Opening a front window a bit will help admit fresh air into the passenger compartment. You can't smell carbon monoxide, so don't rely on your nose
CAR EMERGENCY SURVIVAL ITEMS CHECKLIST:
Durable canvas bag to store supplies
No-spill gas can (5-10 litres.)
Jumper cables (12-20’, be sure to get the right gauge for your vehicle)
Roadside flares/glowsticks, LED flares)
Flat tire inflation canister (non-explosive)
Spare tire and jack
Spare car fuses
First aid supplies kit
Bottled water (10 litres.)
Protein / energy bars
Small tool kit (screwdrivers, pliers, vise grips, adjustable wrench, tire pressure gauge, etc.)
Flashlight and extra batteries or flashlight that doesn’t need batteries
Small, foldable shovel
Car escape tool (incl. seatbelt cutter and window breaker)
Road maps
Blankets
Extra gloves, boots, wool socks, stocking cap (for colder climates)
Fire extinguisher small (ABC type)
Antifreeze
Oil (5 litres)
Roll of duct tape
Paper towels / rags
Washer fluid
Pen and paper
Multipurpose tool
Seasonal supplies (rain gear, umbrella, ice scraper etc.)
Tow rope

Additional Items:
Hand-held GPS unit
Towing strap or chain
Sanitation (hand sanitizer, towelettes, small trash bags)
Emergency car battery charger
Solar battery charger
Extra pair of shoes, gloves etc.
Toiletries, soap, etc.
Cell phone charger (left in car at all times)
Battery powered and/or Hand crank radio
Sleeping bag(s)

Rain coat
Emergency blanket


Window Scraper: Window scrapers are needed for your survival kit as well as every day use during the winter in many parts of the South Island. It helps remove the snow and ice from all of your windows and mirrors. I have used this more than anything in my winter survival kit.

Tow Rope: A sturdy tow rope is helpful, if friendly truckers or motorists offer to pull a stranded vehicle from a snow bank or ditch in a storm.
FINDING USEFUL ITEMS AROUND YOUR HOME:
Some Old Sleeping Bags or Blankets – Many of us have old sleeping bags, quilts and blankets around the house. Remember to include enough for multiple people if you have a family!
Some Warm Clothing - Most of us have old jackets, gloves, hats, boots raincoats. Throw them in the boot!
At Least One Lighter! – Look in drawers and cabinets. If not... spend a couple bucks for a pack of these!
A Few Rubbish Bags – Any large trash bags will work. These can be worn as a poncho, or opened up as a tarp to help make a shelter. If you have an old tarp laying around, definitely use that.
A Small Cooking Pot – That old beat up pot you never use, ... throw it in the boot!
Packs of Instant Noodles – Most people have a few of these stashed in the cupboard. Pack enough to keep you fed for at least a few days.

*You can get creative on what food items you keep in your kit, BUT remember that in most areas, food items will be subjected to temperature extremes when left in a boot of a car, so stick to dry food items. Even canned food will be damaged when repeatedly frozen and heated. Some other dry food items to consider are individually wrapped dry (not chewy) granola bars. Also think about instant coffee, tea, hot chocolate, and other powdered beverage mixes (provide quick energy and/or heat).


EMERGENCY SURVIVAL BIKE
Bugging out by bike is always an option if you're prepared. With a few modifications you can turn an ordinary mountain bike into a bugout bike, or you can buy a collapsible bike to get you home if a catastrophe happens while you're at work and you can't bugout by car. If you're older or need more stability in a bicycle, then you can bugout by tricycle.

A fold up bicycle in your car for emergencies.
While preppers have elaborate schemes to bug out with vehicles ranging from ATVs to school buses and to boats or goats, they often fail to prepare for an escape from their car, truck or SUV. Ultimately, survival might depend on a bug out bicycle

Twizel New Zealand
New Zealand Disaster Survival Guide!
New Zealand, Preppers NZ, Survival, Doomsday Preppers NZ, Emergency, Earthquake,
Storm, Flood, Tsunami, Volcanic Eruption, Landslide, Pandemic,Fire, Emergency Survival Skills,
Disaster Preperation, Economic Disaster, Survival NZ
Twizel New Zealand